The Mood Gallery: Notepad
bar.gif - 1.6 K
November 1998
The Mood Gallery
   

Site's of interest 

http://salon-digital.zkm.de/~evs/ 
http://www.liquidworks.com/nf6.html 
http://www.opencall.com/Tomshinsky/ 
http://www.sacredlove.org/ 
http://www.flash.net/~jimbob1/dd00.htm 
http://www.artauthorities.com/ 
http://www.artmarketing.com/Links/a_olgal.html 
http://www.defend-net.com/fearless_food/contents.html 

VRML Site's of interest

 http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/Heights/2248/musicbox.wrl 
http://codelab.siegelgale.com/solutions/vrml/index.html 
http://www.virtpark.com/theme/factinfo.html 
http://www.immersive.com/ 
http://www.georgecoates.org/ 
http://www.construct.net/projects/chimerium/world.cgi 

Virtual art galleries 
http://www.megsinet.net/~rlsweb/stick/stick.html 
http://reality.sgi.com/employees/paul_asd/impression/index.html 
http://www.fullfeed.com/~wrldcrft/ArtFair/index.html 
http://www.year01.com/year01/gallery.htm 
http://www.fine-art.com/artpost/buysell/messages/1748.html 


Evaluation criteria
design issues 

(exerpts taken from http://www.cais.net/gershom/usab01.html) 
The following points should be taken into account when attempting to ascertain and evaluate a product: 
 

Visual clarity
intuitiveness of labels and messages
Consistency
layout of labels and messages
Compatability
ease of learning
Information feedback
likes/dislikes
explicitness
affordance
flexibility abd control
use of specific system features
error prevention and control
use of colour
ease of use

set of measurable usability goals 

Determine measurement criteria to evaluate usability,determine attributes of concern, such as: 

        • ease of learning;
        • ease of use;
        • usefulness;
        • ease of navigation;
        • affordance; and satisfaction.
Determine the measurements of concern. Consider things you can measure, such as: 
        • the time evaluators take to do something;
        • the number of tasks that can be completed within a given time frame;
        • the number of successful interactions vs. errors;
        • time spent recovering from errors;
        • the number of contiguous errors;
        • the number of commands / features used to complete a task;
        • the frequency of help calls;
        • the frequency of reference to manuals;
        • the number of positive and negative comments;
        • the number of times the evaluator becomes frustrated;
        • the number of times the evaluator appears delighted;
        • the number of times the evaluator gets sidetracked;
Adapted from Jakob Nielsen, Usability Engineering, AP Professional, 1993 
Evaluation Techniques
  1. Iterative Interview - needs to be iterative to provide an opportunity to improve on issues raised during the interview process, allowing time to correct or to improve on details.
  2. Iterative Questionnaire - needs to be iterative to provide an opportunity to improve on issues arising from the questionnaire, allowing time to correct or to improve on details.
  3. Final Interview/Questionnaire - The final evaluation is to be a combined interview with a questionnaire very similar in content to the iterative interviews and questionnaires.
bar.gif - 1.6 K
Virtual Reality Mood Gallery
Project Notebook
Paul
Sarah
Shane
Ted
Last Modified November 11th, 1998